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Beyond Happiness: the zen way to true contentment

Beyond Happiness: the zen way to true contentment
Ezra Bayda
$26.95
Awaiting stock, will ship in 10 – 15 business days
ISBN / SKU
9781590309216
Format
Paperback
Pages
176
Dimensions
212 x 138
Description
Many books have been published in recent years on happiness. Ezra Bayda, a remarkably down-to-earth Zen teacher, believes that the happiness "boom" has been largely a bust for readers. Why? Because it's precisely the pursuit of happiness that keeps us trapped in cycles of dissatisfaction and suffering.

In Beyond Happiness, Bayda draws on Zen teachings to question our conventional notions about what happiness is and where we can find it. Most of us seek happiness in things that are external to us. We imagine that getting more money, a better relationship, or going on a nice vacation will finally make us happy. But Bayda shows us that the deepest and most lasting form of happiness does not rely on external circumstance at all. Bayda offers Zen insights and practices that point readers toward the true sources of lasting happiness: mindfulness, compassion, gratitude, and generosity.

PRAISE
"Bayda writes with exceptional clarity and simplicity about the awakened life. His style is as plainspoken as Pema Chödrön's."—Publishers Weekly

"With compassion and humor, Ezra Bayda has graced us with ways to accept what is and to reside in it fearlessly, giving us a roadmap to enduring happiness and equanimity."—David Richo, PhD, author of The Five Things We Cannot Change

"This book offers an extremely sane, practical, and grounded approach to the larger happiness that lies beyond conventional notions of happiness. Ezra Bayda details simple yet powerful methods both to work with mental and emotional obstacles and to cultivate well-being, and it's clear that his hard-won insights grow out of his own dedicated inquiry and practice. Highly recommended."—John Welwood, author of Toward a Psychology of Awakening

"Bayda's writing is straightforward and his wisdom hard-earned. When he tells us that he himself was 'born with a fairly low set point for happiness,' you get the feeling that Bayda understands what it is that gets people stuck and, having learned a few things himself over years of practice, that his only agenda for Beyond Happiness is to help people find their own way. Fortunately for readers, he's a trustworthy guide."—Tricycle Magazine

"A wise and deep-hearted book, a must-read for today's world."—Roshi Joan Halifax, Upaya Zen Center

"Ezra Bayda is a Zen teacher and former student of Charlotte Joko Beck. He has written four other books, including At Home in the Muddy Water: a Guide to Finding Peace within Everyday Chaos. With his wife, Elizabeth Hamilton, he runs the San Diego Zen Centre, which, as their web-site says, is not affiliated with any particular religious denomination. This is a book that doesn't talk much about Buddhism and has only a handful of references to the Buddha and his teachings. So is it "secular Buddhism," with a watered down yet more widely palatable message promising that happiness is easily within our grasp, or something more?

In the very first sentence Bayda tells us there is no quick fix to unhappiness, and his title, "beyond happiness," suggests that his interest is not in soothing our neurosis and giving easy answers. In some ways his message — which I found deeply inspiring — goes strongly against the current of our "instant rewards" culture.

The book is divided into three main sections: "What blocks happiness?," "The Roots of Happiness," and finally "Cultivating Happiness." In the introductory chapter, he makes a distinction between "personal happiness" — based on our individual disposition or "set point" for happiness and the pleasure we gain from externals, success, praise and things generally going well for us — and what he calls "genuine happiness." Genuine happiness is not dependent on positive conditions such as good health, promotions at work or being in love but on "being fundamentally OK with life as it is," however that is.

One of the few Buddhist teachings he refers to is an early sutta called The Sutta of Two Arrows. This teaching spells out our deeply ingrained tendency to demand that life give us what we want and that it never deal up what we don't want. Both these tendencies cause us suffering (the first arrow). Our habit of complaint and protest about this first arrow causes the second arrow to strike — the pain of our refusal to accept things as they are.

Baydas' first section details the ways in which we cause ourselves pain — through our sense of entitlement (that things should go the way we want them to) and how we get stuck in unhelpful patterns of thinking and behaving. Our expectations, negative emotions, and judgements all prevent us from deeper happiness. Before we can be happy he says we have to see how we cause our own unhappiness. Not only that but we tend to have a distorted view of ourselves so we have to learn to see ourselves more clearly. The view in the mirror is not flattering but our work is to learn to look with kindly awareness.

The "Roots of Happiness" section encourages us to be curious and open to who it is we are. The quality of present moment awareness is the first chapter but its flavour permeates the whole book and gives a real beauty to the following chapters — which focus on generosity, loving-kindness and gratitude — helping create an attitude of freshness and tenderness towards experience, whatever it is. He gives us several tools, in the form of questions, meditations, reflections and stories from his own life and teaching career, to aid awareness and help cultivate genuine happiness. I particularly liked the suggestion to reflect every evening on what has happened during the day (increasing awareness) and noticing what we can feel appreciative of (increasing gratitude).

The section on meditation gives instruction in formless practice and developing loving-kindness, compassion and forgiveness. The loving-kindness practice may seem a little limited or lacking in guidance compared to the traditional practice, which explicitly includes cultivating friendliness to those we have no interest in or actively dislike. He uses the breath throughout various practices as an aid to breathe different people or qualities into the heart.

Bayda makes it clear that the spiritual life is not easy or cosy, at one point, talking about 'the blue collar work of practice'. I was reminded of vipassana teacher Joseph Goldstein who talks about "work days" (of which there are many) and "fruits of practice days" (of which there are few!). The most prized quality according to Bayda is the un-showy perseverance that keeps us steady through the unrewarding but vital 'work days'.

The final section and last five chapters focus on how our growing self knowledge and sense of aliveness is expressed in the world through our work, relationships and the many ways we can express a "generosity of the heart." Giving, or dana, he writes, confronts us with our own fears. This confrontation is necessary to for the heart to learn how to be free. Altruism is obviously strong in Bayda. Practice is not about increasing self-interest. Happiness, he says, ultimately comes from lessening our own grip on what we desire and doing whatever we can to benefit others.

This is a book about serious practice written in an accessible and engaging way. It would be easy to underestimate the value of it, due to the style and focusing as it does on the currently fashionable topic of happiness. To really put into practice what Bayda says, however, requires commitment, patience, faith and, yes, as he says, perseverance."

— Reviewed by Vajradevi @ www.wildmind.org